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Blacklist: Walk On Women Sponsors

The “Walk For Life” is anything but. This demonstration/fundraiser is an anti-choice attack on women’s rights, health, and our very lives. The money raised benefits Life Network, which is an organization that attacks reproductive justice and funds FAKE CLINICS to deceive and endanger women. They’re a sick organization with a lot of blood on their hands, with the nerve to call themselves “pro-life.”

Colorado Springs will be the site of this misogynistic spectacle on June the second. It’s 2012 and people can still get away with blatant bigotry and people act like there’s nothing wrong. Not only is this event allowed and with no notable opposition, at least to my knowledge, but local businesses are openly supporting this attack on women without care.

Well, I care, and so should you. Please share this list and don’t do business with those who would oppose reproductive healthcare, STD prevention and treatment, accurate sexual education, contraception, and abortion care – all of which are necessary for healthy men, women, and children.

Here is a list of proud, corporate sponsors of this battle in the ongoing war against women:

Andrew Wommack Ministries  Academy Women's HealthcareFocus on the Family

Also listed were:

Big Air JumpersChick-fil-A, New Geneva Theological SeminaryRoss Electric,ServiceMaster of Colorado SpringsStarbucks, Well Groomed Ground Maintenance

Day At The Dog Park

Yesterday, my family ventured to Bear-Creek Dog Park. We’d been there a few times before, and quite enjoy it. The park is HUGE. It has an area for large dogs and small dogs, as many parks do. There are clear areas, wooded areas, and a mountain-runoff creek running through for the dogs to play in. There are free donated balls is a basket, a bin of shopping bags for owners to have no excuse not to clean up after their dogs, drinking fountains for humans and dogs, a restroom with a lockout for dogs to wait in, benches, and picnic tables.

It’s nice to bring Molly out. She certainly enjoys the change of pace. Being outside is fun for her, there’s a lot to see and smell and the socialization with humans and dogs is good for her. As for myself, I enjoy seeing Molly have a good time. It’s also nice for me to get to a park, and one with so few children (no screaming!) It’s fun to look around, identifying different dog breeds is if I was at a car show and pleased to see models that I like. I get to see and play with more dogs than I could ever take in to my own home, and that’s quite nice. The other owners have nice chit chat about our dogs, training, care, and so on. Really, a good time is had by all.

Yesterday, it was hot. Whereas other days she either avoided the creek, or tried to cross it by hopping on rocks and avoiding getting her paws wet, she spent most of her day in the water yesterday. All we had to do to keep her entertained was throw her Frisbee in the water and she would jump happily jump right in after it.

We noticed that Molly is very non-confrontational. If another dog so much as came near her toy, she’d approach slowly to see if the other dog would take it. If another dog did take it, she wouldn’t try to grab it but would simply follow the dog around and wait for the dog to drop it so she could get it back. There was one dog in particular who would take Molly’s Frisbee, and then trot away from her casually. The owner said that dog is probably not really interested in the Frisbee but just likes to be chased and has actually learned to run slower just so other dogs could keep up. As for chasing, Molly was happy to oblige.

At one point, another dog a bit larger than Molly invited her to play by wagging his tail and bowing, but also by barking and growling, which Molly evidently found intimidating. When the other dog would bark, Molly would run over to either myself or my boyfriend for safety, but wouldn’t bark or growl back. The barking dog simply found someone else to play with.

The three of us then wandered the huge park, playing fetch as we went along. By the time we had circled the park and returned to our car, Molly was already mostly dry. Happily, we use a dog tarp in the back seat of our Pathfinder, so a moist and slightly muddy dog isn’t a problem, although we really should have brought a towel (Douglas Adams would be displeased to know we forgot one that day.)

It was a fun day. We’re always smiling at that park as we just have a great time. Best of all, it’s free. It’s a great way to spend an afternoon with our dear Molly.

Mt. Cutler and AllTrails

This week, my family of three (with eight legs between us) hiked up Mt. Cutler in Cheyenne Canyon. It was a short, out and back type trail, not even a mile each way, according to my boyfriend’s GPS and a handy app on my iPhone (more on the app later,) but it took us about 45 minutes to get to the top of Mt. Cutler.

The reason the trail took us so long was because there was hard packed snow and ice on the shadowed side of the mountain where the hike begins. It was very, very slippery, especially when we came back down. Once we got to the sunny side, however, snow was no longer a problem and I happily removed my coat.

We saw a few other people on the trail. There was a jogger in shorts, a t-shirt, and running shoes with ice cleats (I still need to get some for my boots,) and a few other hikers. One other hiker stands out though. On the return trip, I fell a few times, landing safely on my backpack, so I was shocked to see a man hiking up with a baby strapped to his back. I foresaw bad things happening…

Molly gave us some reason to worry. She followed my BF up a steep incline off the side of the trail, at his encouragement (bad BF!) Suddenly, I felt a cloud of rocks and dirt fall over my head. My dog had tried to run back down, but instead of taking the dirt path she had on the way up, she took the most direct rout to me. This direct rout was over steep rocks and loose gravel. She fell and got into a bit of a tumble before righting herself. She gave me such a scare, but she wasn’t hurt.

At the top, we enjoyed some victory jerky and took in the view. At only 7231 ft, Mt. Cutler was hardly an impressive mountain. It was barely a hill next to the giants that surrounded it. But it was quick and easy and introduced me to the other trails and peaks in the area to try for another day when we have more time.

As for the view, it was quite nice. :)

Down in front!

I can see Commo Hill from here. When I was in the Army, my platoon would occasionally run up and down that thing. I was not a fan of that.

AllTrails App

I just recently purchased an iPhone, and I love it! I’ve spent hours looking for awesome apps and I’ve found quite a few.

For this trip to Mt. Cuter, I used AllTrails for the first time, and it was just fantastic! I’m still figuring out all of the features, but so far I’ve found that I can:

  • Browse and search for trails nearby, and get driving directions to them from Google Maps.
  • View topographical maps of trails.
  • View trail information such as difficulty, usage, obstacles, type, duration, distance, and elevation gain.
  • Download trail information before I head out so I can access it offline.
  • Use my phone’s GPS to track my hike so my course is marked.
  • Read and write reviews for trails
  • Add new trails to the database or edit existing ones.
  • Read and write trail reviews as well as view and add trail photos.

This app was very useful today in helping us pick a trail, and was fun to play with and explore along the hike. I highly recommend getting it yourself if you have an iPhone, iPad, or Android. It’s FREE!


But I AM In Danger…

I wrote about a visit to a Planned Parenthood in Denver, some time back. I don’t know why, but I was thinking about it again last night and I remembered something that I neglected to talk about before.

“If you were the one in danger of being killed, wouldn’t you want someone to step in and help?”

That’s what one anti, who would just not leave me alone, said to me when I called her out for being a bully, harassing women. At the time, I think, I said something to the effect of “if you really thought that people were being killed in there, I’d like to think that you’d be doing a lot more than just standing around outside, yelling at people.” I wasn’t buying her bullshit for a second.

But it occurred to me last night that I, along with every other woman, actually am , on a regular basis, in danger of being killed. And that, thankfully, there is someone steeping in to help me. This “someone,” however, is not that screaming anti or any of her ilk. No, they’re people who are really endangering my life by being antis and harassing people outside clinics and attacking women’s human rights at every turn – people like that awful woman who followed me that day. Meanwhile, this “someone” stepping in to defend me is actually a whole population of people – the pro-choice movement, and specifically Planned Parenthood itself (and clinics like it.)

I regret now that I did not have the presence of mind, at the time, to say all that. I can only imagine what her stammering, misogynistic excuse would have been. She probably would have dismissed the deaths she’s caused as “suicides,” as was her young protegé’s method of deflecting responsibility and pissing on her victim’s graves.

But it is true. Blocking access to women’s reproductive rights, particularly abortion rights as was the topic of “conversation” (if you can call it that) at the time, kills women. 67-68 thousand every year, according to the World Health Organization’s estimates. And the people responsible for those deaths are the antis. They are the ones killing people. And with the audacity to say things like, “If you were the one in danger of being killed, wouldn’t you want someone to step in and help?”

Fuck you, you anti-choice, anti-life fucks. Only pro-choice can honestly claim to be pro-life.

Thankfully, these monsters aren’t as powerful as they think they are. As was the case here in Colorado last year with amendment 62, Initiative 26 in Mississippi failed to strip women of personhood status by robbing us of our rights to prevent or end pregnancies. Make no mistake, that’s what these so-called “personhood amendments” are really about.

Molly The Mountain Dog

Yesterday, we took Molly on a nice hike in the mountains. This wasn’t the first time we’d taken her on a dayhike. We took her to Garden Of The Gods and wandered the trails in the woods before. It made for a great, though short trip. The only problem was keeping her attention. We weren’t the only ones on the trail. There were hikers, joggers, and it was clear that horses had been through as well. Everything was a distraction so we had to hold her leash short.

We had no such issue this time, as we took her up onto some trails in the mountains where we like to go offroading. Yesterday, there was no one around. Molly was just a delight, she stayed on the trail and listened to every command. She didn’t even try to chase the squirrel that she saw. She had a blast, trotting ahead of us a few yards, her nose to the ground the whole time, then stopping to look back at us over her shoulder as if to say, “Hurry up, slowpokes!” She’s a smart dog, never wandering too far ahead. If she went around the corner and could no longer see us, she’d come bounding back. A few times, my boyfriend and I would just suddenly stop walking and be very quiet, only to giggle at how the dog would immediately stop and look over he shoulder to make sure we were still there.

She has small paws, and trimmed claws, and seemed to have an issue with traction. So did I, in my military issue desert boots. Off the side of the trail you have the slope of the mountain, which is rock covered by a layer of dirt and some fallen vegetation. The ground tended to slip away under you if you strayed from the trail too much. But it was the bare rock outcrops that worried me. Molly liked to prop herself up on them so she could peer over the edge. It was hard not to worry about her slipping off. She wouldn’t fall far, it’s not as if we were on a cliff face, but I don’t want to see anyone get hurt. Thankfully, Molly minded her step.

As we got climbed higher, we encountered more snow, and Molly went nuts. This dog gets so excited around snow. I don’t know if she really loves snow or if the cold makes her want to move more for warmth, but she wagged her tail like crazy and charged all around, only stopping to bury her face in the powder. My boyfriend managed to snap a picture of her with snow on her nose. We had a good laugh when he put it on his facebook page with the caption, “Retired drug dogs have some issues.” He might have a somewhat twisted sense of humor, but so do I so we’re a great match.

Eventually, it did come time to leave. It was getting dark and we knew snow would be rolling in soon. We stopped our truck a few times on our way down the mountain. Once to take a picture of a shot up sign, another time for BF to adjust his lights. At one of these stop, I noticed Molly, who was normally very still during car rides, and twisted her seatbelt harness around herself. As I was correcting it, I noticed that her paw was bleeding lightly. The poor thing ripped her dew claw again, as she had done the day prior. As before, she didn’t limp or whine or give any indication that she was bothered at all. As my BF had brought his medic bag, he quickly patched her up and now she’s doing just fine. I do worry about dew claws. I’m not convinced that a surgery to remove them is worth the risks or the stress to her, but I am looking in to dew claw protectors.

The three of us had a really great time. I’m hoping we can go once more before the weather makes that impossible. After today’s excitement, Molly was very much ready for bed. All she was waiting for was us.

Lessons Learned: 

  • Watch the dew claws. They could snag.
  • People aren’t the only ones who might need first aid so be prepared. I have a first aid kid just for the dog. On a related point, know what’s in the aid kid and where to find it.
  • Dogs seem to never look at the camera when you want them to. Somehow, they always know…
  • Remove the dog’s harness if it would absorb moisture. No one wants something wet on them when it’s cold out.
  • Dogs are not impressed by chess.

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